millennials

5 Ways Millennials Can Rise in the Trump Era

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Tanya

I am the outspoken feminist that Pat Robertson warned you about.

People bitch about millennials a lot. I’m 37 and I can’t count how many times I’ve rolled my eyes at an unsuspecting millennial. Y’all can be a little much sometimes but I still love you. I also have faith in millennials. The horror show that is our political landscape right now can be a catalyst for this generation to rise up and show their strength.

Here are a few ways that millennials could rule the world in the Trump era and beyond:

Millennials Will Put Those Social Media Skills to Good Use

Millennials are always twittering and instagramming and doing all the things on social media. Ever since Trump was elected, we’ve seen how effective social media can be for activism. The Women’s March started out with a Facebook page and look how huge that was. Millennials are our experts in the social media department and can be leaders in using the platform to effect change as they’re already doing but it can be taken to the next level. Where are the apps that are as user friendly and well known as Facebook and Twitter for organizers and activists? We will have even better technology that aids activists and organizers and I would be willing to bet that millennials will be the ones to make that happen.

Millennial Women will Learn How to Help Each Other

If it comes down to it and we lose all our reproductive rights, it will fall on women to figure out how to access safe abortion. Second wave feminists did this back in the day. It was a scary time with tragic consequences but there were always women who organized, who supported women in need, who connected others with resources, and who made the process as safe as possible. Millennial women will need to learn how to do this. It’s a shitty place to be in but it will make your generation stronger if you learn how to survive in times of desperation.

Millennials Can Redefine American Values

Right now, there’s a deep divide in this country and a lot of it comes down to what people think it means to be an American. Let’s all be real for a minute and just recognize that older people tend to be more conservative and their ideas of patriotism are at this point becoming more and more outdated and irrelevant given the changing face of America. Millennials have the opportunity to redefine what American values are. The immediate and passionate opposition to the Muslim ban is a good example. Now is the time to make it perfectly clear that American values are not exclusionary, bigoted, and self serving. We can be better than that. Millennials can lead the way in defining a new brand of patriotism.

Millennials Can Change the Face of Washington

We need more women and more people of color in elected positions. We need them to run for office and win. Millennials can both run and vote and they can change the makeup of our government. The old white man’s club needs to go. They don’t reflect the American people and because there is such a lack of diversity of opinion and life experience, they’re not equipped to make decisions that benefit all of us. Millennials can change that by stepping up and stepping in to the political fray.

Millennials Will Learn How to Fight

Even though what’s happening is really horrible, there is the benefit that once this is all over we will all have learned to value our freedoms; to value our diversity; and to value progress. Millennials will have had to overcome adversity and that’s good for a generation in a certain way. It makes you stronger and it means that if our values are ever threatened in the future, you will recognize it and stop it. Learning how to fight this battle will give millennials a set of skills that will make them invaluable to defending our democracy in the future.

 

So get ready to kick ass, millennials! We’re counting on you to rise up and be the change.

One comment

  1. Go, millennials! I imagine that someone growing up with Obama as president might not have realized until now the wrenching effects that politics can have on our not-very-democratic country. I am 68 and trying still to contribute with funds, marching, and (most important in my view) calls to Congressional representatives. I have a lot of faith in your generation, which by and large understands oppression and equality far better than mine did at your age. Restoring a decent American government can’t happen without a huge effort by all.

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